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Thread: skin cancers

  1. #1
    hde357
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    skin cancers

    Three years ago my nephew had a mole removed from his head (he had this mole his entire life) the mole contained T cells and further tissue removal was necessary. Now at age 7 he went to the dr. to have 2 changing freckles looked at (without knowing his history) the dr. ordered immediate removal... they are being removed today. I am concerned as 3 members of his dads family have had melanoma. I am unable to find any documentation re: children and skin cancer... is it possible?
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Top User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Hi

    There have been familial syndromes related to myeloma. Please see excerpts taken from Up-to-Date:

    Some familial cases occur in the setting of the familial atypical multiple mole and melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome, also called the dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). This syndrome was originally described in two kindreds in which affected subjects had multiple (over 100) dysplastic (atypical) nevi, and their lifetime cumulative incidence of melanoma approached 100 percent [5,6]. A family history of melanoma in multiple first degree relatives, and younger age at diagnosis are important components of this syndrome. The median age at diagnosis in one series of 23 kindreds was 33, well below that in patients with sporadic melanomas; this difference may be due in part to increased surveillance of subjects from affected families [7]. However, since there is wide clinical variability in the nevus phenotype (such as size and number of moles and degree of irregularity in border and color), there is currently no consensus as to a formal definition of the "atypical mole/melanoma" syndrome.
    So there is a link, especially in the family that you described. You should have your nephew see a geneticist to be sure.

    regards.
    Leo
    Leonardo F - Webmaster Cancer Forums
    Disclaimer: this information is for informational purposes only. It is not medical advice.

  3. #3
    Regular User
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    I would say its definitely possible and when the topic is cancer, I would say take it very seriously until it is completely ruled out. Much easier to stop it when it's early than to fight it when it is more developed. It is definitely plausible, although rare for a child to develop skin cancer. I had a fairly severe case of melanoma when I was 12 and pulled through it after ~1.5-2 years of treatment off/on.

  4. #4
    New User
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    re: skin cancers

    I realize the original post is quite old. If this post isn't appropriate, mods please feel free to remove it.

    I have identical 14 yr old twin boys, both of whom have numerous moles over their bodies. I noticed about a yr or so ago that the one boy had a patch of gray hair. Since then I've noticed about 5-6 spots on his head that have about 20 or more gray hairs. Each cluster of gray seems to sprout from a light coloured non-raised mole. I've taken him to our doctor who admitted he'd never seen something like this and is in the process of researching it. He said it's likely nothing of concern but will probably refer him to a dermotoligist to rule out skin cancer. Unfortunately - it could take several months to get in to see one. I should also add that he also has several body moles with white rings around them, which I pointed out to the doctor.
    Family history of skin cancer, as far as I know is only 1 maternal uncle, of many relatives although other cancers are very prevelent on the faternal side as are a large number of moles.
    Obviously we're rather concerned, especially. I've seen premature graying in teens - but it seems very odd to me given they're identical twins, no history of pre-mature gray in family, and sprouting from numerous moles.

    Unlike the original post - they were not 'born' with numerous moles - isn't that what nevi is? The moles began showing up at about age 3.
    I've been unable to find any info on something like this elsewhere.

 
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