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Thread: A death from Glioblastoma Multiforme

  1. #1
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    Question A death from Glioblastoma Multiforme

    I know it's hard to talk about, but how does it end? How does one die from Glioblastoma, especially frontal lobe tumors? I tried to google it, and I find that death from glioblastoma is usually due to cerebral edema or increased intracranial pressure. But I don't know anything about it. Is it painful? Do patients die in sleep? What exactly happen to them? How does it look like?

    Thank you very much for all your answers. Sorry for my poor english, I'm from Europe and don't speak english very well.

  2. #2
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    Brainman and Doublewhammy will be able to provide you with personal experience. However, if you google brain hospice, it will take you to a site that will answer your question. It even includes a timeline.

    Take care,

    Arleen

  3. #3
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    It all depends on the location in the brain. Lots of different areas of the brain handle lots of different bodily functions.
    Whatever function is handled by the brain area next to the tumor will exhibit symptoms. For example, my moms first symptoms were increased heart rate and difficulty selecting words for speaking. Fast forward to her final month, she could only speak a couple of words at a time, and her last week she couldn't speak at all. My Dad's symptoms were really moody. I thought he seemed like a depressed zombie when he was first exhibiting symptoms.

    You arent really going to find one good reference that tells you how a GBM patient dies, since there are so many combinations based on tumor location affecting whatever brain function is handled in the same area. Im sorry theres no good answer to your question. I was doing the same research a while back and also found
    that there are few easy answers. I will say this- their oncologist told me that a fair amount of the time the patient dies during sleep of a brain hemorrhage.

    I wish it was that easy with my mom- her breathing, pulse, and body temp all were malfunctioning near the end. I dont know if theyre going to do an autopsy on her, but my basic opinion in layman's terms is that her brain finally short circuited and stopped working.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________
    Mother with Glioblastoma Multiforme, had surgery 4/23/07, at age 63. Survived 1272 days afterward. Her last 24 on hospice.
    Father with Glioblastoma Multiforme, had surgery 11/2/09, at age 66. Survived 433 days afterward. His last 154 on hospice.

    http://www.gildasclub.org/
    Its 100% free and offers support, networking, and social activities to cancer patients and their families and friends.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by artaran View Post
    Brainman and Doublewhammy will be able to provide you with personal experience. However, if you google brain hospice, it will take you to a site that will answer your question. It even includes a timeline.

    Take care,

    Arleen

    Thank you. {Link deleted per forum policy}- That's exactly what I needed.
    Last edited by brainman; 10-21-2010 at 09:00 PM.

  5. #5
    Administrator Top User brainman's Avatar
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    Cancer itself is almost never the direct reason for a person's death. More often it is something associated with the cancer such as swelling of the brain, respiratory failure... As with DoubleWhammy's mother, it can often be a multi-system failure. If there is a good thing about GBMIV, in most cases, death is painless with the person becoming less and less alert.
    Jim
    Long-term cancer survivor
    1992 Astrocytoma grade 2, left motor strip
    2005 Recurrence this time said to be an Oligodendroglioma grade 3, same location.
    http://cancerforums.net/viewtopic.php?t=2405
    My Story Part 1: http://cancerforums.net/viewtopic.php?t=2528
    My Story Part 2: http://cancerforums.net/viewtopic.php?p=7350
    My Story Part 3: http://cancerforums.net/viewtopic.php?t=8029

  6. #6
    Thank you for your honesty. It is hard to get answers from our doctors. Its like they are afraid to tell us anything bad. I am so sorry to hear that you lost both parents to this horrible cancer. My aunt has finished her treatment but I fear what the future holds.

  7. #7
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    If your doublewhammy then what do my wife call each other?

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleWhammy View Post
    It all depends on the location in the brain. Lots of different areas of the brain handle lots of different bodily functions.
    Whatever function is handled by the brain area next to the tumor will exhibit symptoms. For example, my moms first symptoms were increased heart rate and difficulty selecting words for speaking. Fast forward to her final month, she could only speak a couple of words at a time, and her last week she couldn't speak at all. My Dad's symptoms were really moody. I thought he seemed like a depressed zombie when he was first exhibiting symptoms.

    You arent really going to find one good reference that tells you how a GBM patient dies, since there are so many combinations based on tumor location affecting whatever brain function is handled in the same area. Im sorry theres no good answer to your question. I was doing the same research a while back and also found
    that there are few easy answers. I will say this- their oncologist told me that a fair amount of the time the patient dies during sleep of a brain hemorrhage.

    I wish it was that easy with my mom- her breathing, pulse, and body temp all were malfunctioning near the end. I dont know if theyre going to do an autopsy on her, but my basic opinion in layman's terms is that her brain finally short circuited and stopped working.
    My wife and I both have GBM. Weird when I first read this that your parents both had this. I hope and pray that conditions for them and your family were better for them than my wife and I. My wife and I have been totally been cut off by our son and daughter. It seems quite positive that your relationship with your Parents was much better. My wife is entering in the phase where she cannot make since when it comes to communicating. It is good her father and step mother still talk to her as well as our Ex son in Law and both of our grandsons. We have never met our grand-daughter or daughter-in-law. My whole family with the exception of my 2 grandsons only talk to me. The history of mental and brain disorders is unique. her GGrandmother had Demetia as well as her grandmother and her mother was diagnosed with Bi-polar as well as my wife and our daughter. That's 5 generations with symptoms of mental diseases. In my case my father died at 77 with a gbm in 2012 and I am 52 presently (today is July 12-bday july 26) I have the symptoms your father had sort of with the feeling of that my only wish is to barely out-live my wife because not another caring soul will care for her. I don't leave my bed but to eat and go to bathroom. Exreme Depression. I was beaten as a child and worked as a slave until I left home on my 17 bday to enlist in marine Corp so I could legally take lives. I have had in the range of 40 to 50 or more concussions and two coma's. A factor I doubt it. My son showed more violent tendencies as a child than I did and from what I have heard has gotten worse but unlike my daughter has not tried to get any help at all. Quite a family I know and the worst of it I left out about my Dad. I guess what I was wondering was if at all you feel like sharing but I would fully understand if you didn't was about your parents lives and behaviors of their families. If not then that is understandable and God Bless you for what you have had to go through.
    Thank you
    Bob and Leslie

  8. #8
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    Hi Bob, welcome. I'm sorry to hear of your wife's and your GBMs.

    This post is from 2010, so the poster probably won't be back to answer. I don't remember seeing him or her in the last five years.

    Yours is the third case I've heard of with a couple both getting GBM; there must be some environmental factor that hasn't been discovered yet.

 

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