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Thread: PanCan Clinical Trials

  1. #1
    Top User lancepeace's Avatar
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    PanCan Clinical Trials

    ****** THIS THREAD IS NOT A DISCUSSION THREAD. ******

    PLEASE POST INFORMATION ON CLINICAL TRIALS WITH THE NAME OF THE DRUG/TREATMENT IN THE SUBJECT AND WHAT TYPE OF TREATMENT IT IS (Chemo, Immunotherapy, Radiation, Surgery, etc).

    IN THE BODY OF YOUR POST PLEASE INCLUDE A LINK TO INFORMATION ABOUT THE TRIAL AND A BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF THE TRIAL

    In order to make this thread more useful, the moderators will periodically go through and delete "discussion only" or "sidebar" comments that do not add significant information. Please keep discussions, thank you's, etc in the non-sticky threads below.

    ************************************************** *********************

    FROM DebbieC:
    One of our members, Queensville, sent me a PM last night with an idea about posting a sticky in our forum with info about clinical trials. It didn’t take me long to think about it and realize that this would be something very helpful for those just starting out on this journey or for those who have exhausted all other standard treatments and are now entertaining the idea of a clinical trial.

    What is a clinical trial?
    In a nutshell, a clinical trial is a research study where new drugs or new combinations of drugs are given to participants and monitored to determine effectiveness and safety. The results are used by the FDA to determine whether or not that drug will be approved as a standard treatment for that illness. For example, Abraxane is currently approved for treatment of breast cancer, and most recently lung cancer, but studies are going on to determine its effectiveness for pancreatic cancer….so far, so good!

    For more detailed info about what clinical trials are, and for some interesting facts….
    http://pancan.org/section_facing_pan...ials/index.php
    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-...s/learn#WhatIs

    What are the phases of clinical trials?
    Knowing what each stage entails is very important and SHOULD be considered when choosing a clinical trial.

    Phase 1: Researchers test an experimental drug or treatment in a small group of people (20-80) for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range, and identify side effects. Basically, when in a phase 1 trial, they are just looking to see how humans will react to the drug. There is a phase 0 where there is little to no human exposure, so this is their first look into the safety of the drug.

    Phase 2: The experimental treatment is given to a larger group of people (100-300). These studies are focused on effectiveness (whether the drug works). For example, participants receiving the drug may be compared with participants receiving a different treatment. In some trials for certain conditions, the different treatment might be a placebo. This is not the case in pancreatic cancer trials. Pancreatic cancer participants will either get the current standard treatment or the new treatment that is being tested. According to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, they will always receive some form of treatment.

    Phase 3: The treatment is given to large groups of people (1,000-3,000). These drugs have been tested for safety (phase 1) and tested for effectiveness (phase 3). Double blind studies are common and different dosages and combinations are continued to be used for further data collection. Basically, in this phase they know the drug works and are trying to perfect it to find its peak effectiveness...this is the ideal phase of a clinical trial to participate in!

    Phase 4: These drugs have been approved by the FDA and are tested to see the results over time. They sometimes test drugs in these phases to see how effective they will be to treat other conditions as well.

    Where do I find a clinical trial?
    Here’s a good start in locating a clinical trial:

    My personal favorite…the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. You can find trials that are specific to pancreatic cancer and specific to your needs. I used this to find one for my dad. I submitted the online form and got a phone call from one of their reps within the hour with 6 possible trials that he may have qualified for. They are wonderful! http://pancan.org/section_facing_pan...cal_trials.php

    http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials (USA)

    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ (This is a worldwide database)

    http://www.cancer.org/treatment/trea...tching-service (USA)

    http://www.canadiancancertrials.ca/ (Canada)

    http://www.australiancancertrials.gov.au/ (Austrailia)

    http://www.pancreaticcancer.org.uk/i...linical-trials (UK..thanks Susy100)

    Compliments of Queensville, I am including links to 2 of her posts describing common scoring systems, Karnofsky Scoring and the ECOG, which are used to determine a participant’s eligibility in a clinical trial. Having this info in advance may give you a better idea if you or your loved one will be eligible for a specific trial that you are looking into. I have to add though, that even if you think you will not qualify….ask anyway!

    http://www.cancerforums.net/threads/...nofsky-Scoring
    http://www.cancerforums.net/threads/...ormance-Status

    Lots of information in this thread, and still much more info to be found out there! This is just scratching the surface, but I hope that this will help someone in the future. Remember to add information about specific trials below, remind me of something that I may have forgot…and also remember that if it wasn't for these clinical trials, there would be no treatments available currently or in the future! The more people that participate in these trials, the more data there will be, resulting in bigger and better treatments….one of which may be the cure!

    A very important point shared by a member tonight....Every treatment we have today is thanks to previous cancer patients who went through clinical trials.

    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01453153
    The Trial above. Article below.

    Overall survival increases in mice

    Art Chimes Voice of America March 20 2012

    Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center report they've found a way to break through the unique biological barrier a pancreas cancer tumor builds around itself in mice.
    Scientists in Seattle are reporting a potential breakthrough in the treatment of pancreas cancer, a disease which stubbornly resists most therapies.

    Pancreas cancer tumors are resistent to chemotherapy partly because they form a biological barrier around themselves.

    Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center believe they've found a way to break that barrier down.

    "Pancreas cancer actually has the highest one-year and five-year mortalities of any cancer," says Sunil Hingorani, senior author of the study published in Cancer Cell.

    That high fatality rate has been something of a puzzle for researchers who study pancreatic cancer. Powerful chemotherapy drugs that kill off pancreas cancer cells in the laboratory are next to useless in living cancer patients.

    Scientists have observed how tumors in the pancreas, in effect, wall themselves off with a collagen material similar to scar tissue. That exerts pressure on the blood vessels that supply the tumor, collapsing many of them and restricting not just the flow of blood but also of chemotherapy drugs.

    "And so in this way, the tumor actually isolates itself completely from the circulation, and when we try to give drugs through the vein, they essentially bypass the tumor and instead go everywhere else," Hingorani says.

    So the problem may not be that the chemotherapy medicine doesn't work, but that it simply may not be able to reach its target.

    To find out, Hingorani and his colleagues used mice genetically engineered to stand in for human pancreatic cancer patients. They treated them with the standard chemotherapy drug, gemcitabine, plus the enzyme PEGPH20, which is designed to open up the collapsed blood vessels that supply the tumor.

    "We found that in essentially every animal that we tested, we saw the tumors shrink or at least stop growing," he said. "And we found that overall survival increased by about 70 percent — so not quite doubling, but just about."

    Of course, what works on mice doesn't necessarily work on people, so the researchers are beginning human trials. Hingorani says he is optimistic, but cautions that it will be a year or two before results are available from the tests with people.

    However, if all works as the researchers hope, not only would the chemotherapy be more effective, there may be fewer nasty side effects. That's because with more of the medicine actually reaching the tumor, doctors may be able to use less of the powerful chemotherapy drugs.
    Last edited by BobInBonita; 02-03-2015 at 04:27 PM. Reason: Move DebbieC info to top

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Top User po18guy's Avatar
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    Apparent Pancreatic breakthrough in early clinical trials

    PEGPH20 Chemo/enzyme combo Early human clinical
    Hello, all! Jim here from the Non-Hodkin's Lymphoma side. A friend is currently in pre-Whipple chemotherapy at Fred Hutchinson (SCCA). Her sister, who lost her husband to pancreatic cancer, monitors the latest developments in treatment. She forwarded a news release to me regarding a very promising development at Fred Hutchinson in Seattle. The researcher and his colleagues seem to have made progress in breaking down and penetrating the membrane which surrounds pancreatic tumors, thus substantially increasing chemotherapy's effectiveness against the tumor. Here is a link to the press release: http://www.fhcrc.org/content/public/...-research.html

    I am big into hope, and this development is certainly promising. May peace be with each of you.

    Here is a link to the page for the clinical trial. http://www.seattlecca.org/clinical-t...CT01453153.cfm

    F.Y.I. I am still here solely because of a clinical trial, so I would definitely not write it off because of its trial status. Have a look at the qualifications, because there are not a lot of options with pancreatic.
    Last edited by BobInBonita; 02-03-2015 at 04:46 PM. Reason: combined posts
    07/08 Age 56 DX 1) Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma-Not Otherwise Specified. Stage IV-B, >50 ("innumerable") tumors, bone marrow involvement.
    08/08-12/08 Four cycles CHOEP14 + four cycles GND (Cyclofosfamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Etoposide, Prednisone & Gemcitabine, Navelbine, Doxil)
    02/09 2) Relapse.
    03/09-06/13 Clinical trial of Romidepsin > long-term study. NED for 64 twenty-eight day cycles, dose tapered.
    07/13 3) Relapse, 4) Suspected Mutation.
    08/13-02/14 Romidepsin increased, stopped for lack of response. Watch & Wait.
    09/14 Relapse/Progression. Visible cervical nodes appear within 4 days of being checked clear.
    10/06/14 One cycle Belinostat. Discontinued to enter second clinical trial.
    10/25/14 Clinical trial of Alisertib/Failed - Progression.
    01/12/15 Belinostat resumed/Failed - Progression. 02/23/15
    02/24/15 Pralatrexate/Failed - Progression. 04/17/15
    04/15 Genomic profiling reveals mutation into PTCL-NOS + AngioImmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma. Stage IV-B a second time. Two dozen tumors + small intestine (Ileum) involvement.
    04/22/15 TREC (Bendamustine, Etoposide, Carboplatin). Full response in two cycles. PET/CT both clear. Third cycle followed.
    06/15-07/15 Transplant preparation (X-rays, spinal taps, BMB, blood test, MUGA scan, lung function, CMV screening, C-Diff testing etc. etc. etc.) Intrathecal Methotrexate during spinal tap.
    BMB reveals 5) 26% blast cells of 20q Deletion Myelodysplastic Syndrome MDS), a bone marrow cancer.
    07/11-12/15 Cyclofosfamide + Fludarabine conditioning regimen.
    07/16/15 Total Body Irradiation.
    07/17/15 Moderate intensity Haploidentical Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant receiving my son's peripheral blood stem cells.
    07/21-22/15 Triple dose Cyclofosfamide + Mesna, followed by immunosuppressants Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil.
    07/23-08/03/15 Marrow producing zero blood cells. Fever. Hospitalized two weeks.
    08/04/15 Engraftment occurs, and blood cells are measureable - released from hospital.
    08/13/15 Day 26 - Marrow is 100% donor cells. Platelets climbing steadily, red cells follow.
    09/21/15 Acute skin Graft versus Host Disease arrives.
    DEXA scan reveals Osteoporosis.
    09/26/-11/03/15 Prednisone to control skin GvHD.
    11/2015 Acute GvHD re-classified to Chronic Graft versus Host Disease.
    05/2016 Tacrolimus stopped. Prednisone from 30-90mg daily tried. Sirolimus begun.
    09/16/16 Three skin punch biopsies.
    11/04/16 GvHD clinical trial of Ofatumumab (Arzerra) + Prednisone + Methylprednisolone begun.
    12/16 Type II Diabetes, Hypertension - both treatment-related.
    05/17 Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) begun in attempt to control chronic Graft-versus-Host-Disease (cGvHD.
    06/17 Trying various antibiotics in a search for tolerable prophylaxis.
    08/17 Bone marrow biopsy reveals the presence of 2% cells with 20q Deletion Myelodysplastic Syndrome, considered to be Minimum Residual Disease. Active surveillance is the course of choice.
    To date: 18 chemotherapeutic drugs in 9 regimens (4 of them at least twice), 5 salvage regimens, 3 clinical trials, 4 post-transplant immuno-suppressant drugs, the equivalent of 1,000 years of background radiation from scanning from 45+ CT series scans and about 24 PET scans. Two lymphoid malignancies plus a myeloid malignancy lend a certain symmetry to the journey.

    Believing in the redemptive value of suffering makes all the difference.

  3. #3
    Senior User prairielala's Avatar
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    I had a question. Debbie you said that according to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network that when a patient joins a clinical trial even if they don't get the trial drug or treatment they get some sort of treatment instead. I was looking at this trial http://www.canadiancancertrials.ca/T...505530&lang=en on canadiancancertrials.ca. It's no longer open obviously. But it mentions that the three drugs were Gemcitabine, Placebo, and the trial drug. Since Gemcitabine is the standard treatment for pancreatic cancer does that mean that placebo is actually placebo.

    I guess my main question is does anyone know if things are different up here in Canada? Do pancreatic cancer clinical trials always have some sort of treatment for the participants here in Canada as well?

    Thanks!

    Response from DebbieC:

    In looking at the study, there is a trial drug that they are testing (LY2495655). The study will have two groups that is given Gemcitabine + LY2495655 at different strengths. The third group will receive Gemcitabine + placebo.

    They will still be given Gemcitabine regardless of the group they are in. Go to this site....
    http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01505530

    It describes it in more detail than the one in the link you provided in your post. I hope that helps!

    As to whether or not the same "rules" apply to Canada as to US, I can't be sure. I would only suggest researching the ins and outs of the trial as best you can and on more than one website, if possible. As you can see, some give more detail than others. I was able to find another location for this specific trial just by doing a Google search for more info. Again, I hope that helps!
    Last edited by BobInBonita; 02-03-2015 at 04:53 PM. Reason: Combined post & reply to simplify thread
    Spring 2012 Grandpa diagnosed, Stage III PC
    Summer 2012 Xeloda/Radiation
    Fall 2012 Scan, Tumour grown and mets to liver, Stage IV
    4.5 month break from treatment
    Winter 2012 Scan, mets appear to be small enough that they can't say for sure what they are
    3 weeks Gemcitabine
    Spring 2013 Scan, no shrinking but no growth or spread
    3 more weeks Gemcitabine
    ~ Made it to the one year milestone ~
    Late Spring 2013 Scan showed more liver mets, end to chemo.
    June 2013 He went to sleep.

  4. #4
    Top User Queensville's Avatar
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    Hi Prarielala,

    I am from Ontario Canada. When hubby was on the abraxane trial, there were two arms (groups of people). One group got Gemcitabine and Abraxane and the other group got Gemcitabine with Placebo. That meant that the people who run the study would always hang two bags get hung on the pole no matter what patient it was done for. It's called a double blind study. This way the data is based purely on their objective observations of the patient results. That being said, Hubby's second bag listed the name of the drug on it. Whether a placebo bag does the same or not, I do not know.

    It's good to get our experiences so you know what you have concerns about, but make sure you get a note book, write down these type of questions then ask your oncologist each and every one. One center may or may not be the same as the other. And conversely, one trial may not be the same as another.

    Your hospitals website may also have clarification.

    Cheers. Queensville
    July 22 2011 Hubby (64) Diagnosed PanCan. Sept2011- Feb 2012: Abraxane/Gemcitabine. Feb-May 2012:Gemcitabine only. June-Sept 2012 5FU. Sept 4-no more chemo - Just living life. Multiple stents. Jan 2013/18 month mark. Mets everywhere. Looking for a bumper sticker that says 'Stay at safe distance - Driver suffering caregiver burnout'. Hospice Thurs Feb 28 2013. March 12 2013 he went off to his new adventure where we will one day meet again. It was 20 months from date of diagnosis until now.

  5. #5
    Top User Queensville's Avatar
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    Hi all,

    I am moving the name of Hubby's potential trial into this thread. It's ok with me if anyone wants to use it as a sample trial to ask questions from - then anyone who has the answer (and how they found it) can post a response. This way other people who are looking at trials will know how to research info on their own trial so they can make an informed choice. Hubby and I have been doing the trial thing long enough that we would not be offended if ppl used ours and a sample to work from. Knowing how to understand and research a potential trial that one may participate in is vital - and if we can help people with their understanding of trial paperwork by providing a sample of our own to work from - then so be it.

    http://www.ontario.canadiancancertri...484860&lang=en


    Queensville
    July 22 2011 Hubby (64) Diagnosed PanCan. Sept2011- Feb 2012: Abraxane/Gemcitabine. Feb-May 2012:Gemcitabine only. June-Sept 2012 5FU. Sept 4-no more chemo - Just living life. Multiple stents. Jan 2013/18 month mark. Mets everywhere. Looking for a bumper sticker that says 'Stay at safe distance - Driver suffering caregiver burnout'. Hospice Thurs Feb 28 2013. March 12 2013 he went off to his new adventure where we will one day meet again. It was 20 months from date of diagnosis until now.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Top User DebbieC's Avatar
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    And speaking of clinical trials...

    Here is some info about a clinical trials webinar that might be of interest to some. I think it sounds amazing and will definitely be listening in. And...it's FREE!

    Clinical Trials: A Physician's Perspective
    Thursday, January 10, 2013
    1 - 2 p.m. PST *
    *2 p.m. MST, 3 p.m. CST, 4 p.m. EST

    This webinar will discuss important concepts that patients and caregivers should understand about clinical trials, as well as the importance of clinical research from a physician’s point of view. You will learn about the phases of clinical trials, standard processes in place to protect and inform participants, and hear the truth about several common myths that surround clinical trials. You will also hear about novel treatment options for pancreatic cancer within the context of clinical trials.

    Speaker:
    Daniel A. Laheru, MD
    Associate Professor of Oncology
    Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Co-Director, Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer

    Register for this webinar by clicking here...
    https://www144.livemeeting.com/lrs/8...vp609tbs8cjsvn

    After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing a link to join the webinar on Thursday, January 10, 2013.

    You can listen to the audio portion of the presentation through your computer speakers or you can dial the toll-free number that will be listed in your confirmation email.
    Last edited by DebbieC; 12-11-2012 at 07:51 PM.
    March 21, 2011 - Dad diagnosed. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma on head of pancreas.
    April 2011 - Gemcitabine and radiation for a total of 12 weeks.
    October 14, 2011 - Successful Whipple procedure. Cancer free! Best 5 months of my life!!!
    March 2, 2012 - CT scan and discovery of possible mets to both lungs.
    March 23, 2012 - Biopsy confirmed recurrence.
    May 2, 2012 - Folfiri regimen started. Stopped after 2 treatments due to infection.
    June 2, 2012 - Switched to Xeloda
    Sept. 21, 2012 - No more chemo...treatment not working anymore. Now we wait and pray.
    October 6, 2012 - My dad is now at peace in Heaven, watching over us until we meet again.

    ♥ Forever in my heart! Miss you every day more than words can say! ♥

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Top User DebbieC's Avatar
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    The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is calling Mondays "Myth Buster Monday" on Facebook and is debunking myths about clinical trials. Looks like they will be posting 2 each Monday. I'll post them as they pop up each week....

    Myth# 1: Clinical trial participants may receive a placebo (sugar pill) instead of drugs that will treat their disease.

    This myth is FALSE! All participants in clinical trials receive either the experimental treatment or the standard, best known treatment.

    Myth # 2: Only people who have run out of all other treatment options or have end-stage pancreatic cancer enter clinical trials.

    This myth is FALSE! In fact, patients at all stages of the disease enroll in trials, and many trials are for patients who have never been treated.

    Myth # 3: Clinical trial participants are treated as 'guinea pigs'.

    This myth is FALSE! In fact, clinical trials participants are closely monitored by leading physicians and informed of all steps throughout the clinical trial process.
    Last edited by DebbieC; 01-21-2013 at 04:41 PM.
    March 21, 2011 - Dad diagnosed. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma on head of pancreas.
    April 2011 - Gemcitabine and radiation for a total of 12 weeks.
    October 14, 2011 - Successful Whipple procedure. Cancer free! Best 5 months of my life!!!
    March 2, 2012 - CT scan and discovery of possible mets to both lungs.
    March 23, 2012 - Biopsy confirmed recurrence.
    May 2, 2012 - Folfiri regimen started. Stopped after 2 treatments due to infection.
    June 2, 2012 - Switched to Xeloda
    Sept. 21, 2012 - No more chemo...treatment not working anymore. Now we wait and pray.
    October 6, 2012 - My dad is now at peace in Heaven, watching over us until we meet again.

    ♥ Forever in my heart! Miss you every day more than words can say! ♥

  8. #8
    Senior User hiyasofsj's Avatar
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    CLINICAL TRIALS: A CLINICIAN'S PERSPECTIVE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYHVV4wxnoE


    Published on Jan 15, 2013


    This webinar will discuss important concepts that patients and caregivers should understand about clinical trials, as well as the importance of clinical research from a physician's point of view. You will learn about the phases of clinical trials, standard processes in place to protect and inform participants, and hear the truth about several common myths that surround clinical trials. You will also hear about novel treatment options for pancreatic cancer within the context of clinical trials.

    This webinar was recorded on January 10, 2013. The presenter was Daniel A. Laheru, MD - Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center.
    07/2011 - Annie age 57 dx w/inoperable stage 4 pc; 5cm tumor/body, two spots on liver 1cm each, CA19-9=21,000+
    08/2011 - folfirinox
    01/2012 - CT: liver healthy, tumor=4mm, CA19-9 normal
    06/2012 - comp 9.5cycles. Tumor=scar tissue.
    CT: NED (No evidence of new or progressive metastatic disease, No tumor recurrence.) Chemotherapy STOPPED. Only medications taken are EPIVIR for the liver and METFORMIN for type 2 diabetes.
    09/2012 - CT: NED
    12/2012 - CT: NED. Runs a 10 kilometer race.
    01/2013 - re-instated gym membership 2-hrs back to back daily training 5x weekly.
    05/2013 - CT: NED; 3-hrs back to back workouts at the gym
    08/2013 - CT: NED; 3-hrs circuit training 6x weekly

  9. #9
    Senior User MSH's Avatar
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    FOLFIRINOX Chemo Results in locally advanced PanCan

    This is the largest published series of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX. Recently, the activity of FOLFIRINOX in patients with borderline or locally advanced pancreatic cancer was reported [15], which included a total of 18 patients, of whom 14 had locally advanced disease. In these 14 patients, four patients proceeded directly to surgery after 3–12 cycles of FOLFIRINOX, and two of these 14 had an R0 resection. An additional three patients underwent R0 resections after completing chemoradiation treatment. Thus, the R0 resection rate in this case series, excluding the patients with borderline resectable disease, was 36% (5 of 14 patients). Our R0 resection rate of 23% (5 of 22 patients) is in the range reported by Hosein et al. [15] and may reflect a new era of converting locally advanced pancreatic cancer into resectable pancreatic cancer with the use of FOLFIRINOX

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23657686

    Given that many of us have non-resectable disease at diagnosis the use of Folfirinox and chemoradiation to give a resection rate of 20+% is really exciting. Anyone wanting to read the full study needs only to register with The Oncologist.
    Last edited by BobInBonita; 02-03-2015 at 04:57 PM.
    62 year old male
    Non-resectable adenocarcinoma of pancreas
    presenting February 2013 with obstructive jaundice.
    April 2013 Commenced Folfirinox.
    July 2013 CT scan after 6 cycles shows tumour shrinking but
    also reveals evidence of previously occult bony metastases.
    Oct 2013 completed 12 courses of Folfirinox.
    Nov 2013 PET scan finds mild uptake in transverse process of T5
    Jan 2014 Nanoknife to pancreatic lesion.
    Aug 2014 MRI finds bony lesion now extending into T4,5,6 and 12.
    Sept 2014 Radiotherapy 2000 cGy to T 3-7 : Recommenced Folfirinox.
    May 2015 After 9 cycles CA19-9 down from 7486 to 201.
    Stopped responding to Folfirinox after 26 cycles Ca19-9 up to 2241
    Dec 2015 Now on 2nd line treatment with Gemcitabine Ca19-9 dropped to 1351
    Apr 2016 2nd NanoKnife

  10. #10
    Top User sdrutledge's Avatar
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    CFI-400945 Checkpoint Inhibitor of PLK4 Early Human Trials

    There was an announcement from Princess Margaret HOspital (in Canada) about a new discovery in cancer research. Here is the link - it does sound promising and could apply to multiple cancers http://www.thestar.com/life/health_w...er_growth.html
    Last edited by BobInBonita; 02-03-2015 at 05:00 PM.
    October 21012: Husband age 50 diagnosed with Stage IV pan cancer with mets to liver. 12 treatments of Folfirinox. Chemo break June 2013 - March 2014. Back on Folfirinox for 4 treatments, then cancelled. CT Scan, ultrasound, biopsy only confirm cancer is back but no treatment recommended. Another scan in a week. Radiation:5 treatments in 4 days, stereodatic radiation (aka cyberknife) late July. No effect. September 2 weeks in hosp with blood infection. Oct: 6 chemo (Gem) No effect. November - at home, me at home full time. Slow decline til Nov 20 when admitted to palliative care. Body and mind ravaged by disease, toxins, my beautiful Carlos passed away on Thurs Nov.27 . May he rest in God's gentle hands in eternal comfort.

 

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