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Thread: Overian cancer 3c grade3

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Overian cancer 3c grade3

    Hi everyone
    My wife was diagnosed overian cancer 3c about 6months ago.she is 37years old
    She had an operation (removed both overies ,omentum and appendix)
    She has been undergoing on 6 chemo (taxol/carbo)
    Cancer responded very well on treatment.
    Before she has been taking 1st chemo marker was 8000 after 1st dropped to 3600 2nd -1800 3rd -80 4th- 9 5th -9 and last 6th chemo -8
    Last week she had CT scan , 3 days later we have seen the doctor ,he said all cancer gone apart of small spots between the liver and peritoneum
    He also said that small spots could be rest of the death cancer cells and would stay as it is and would not grow or spread anywhere
    They can not offer her another chemotherapy at the moment because she just has had 6 already. He has booked another CT scan in 3 months time to look at it again
    We are a little bit worried ,we hoped that all cancer gone
    What if spots will start growing? she will back on chemo again
    I do not understand why some spots left? This is normal ? Is anyone has experienced similar situation? I thought that chemo will removed all of it...
    Many thanks
    Lucas

  2. #2
    Hi Lucas, it sounds like she had a wonderful response to the chemo! I assume the numbers you gave are her CA-125 levels? They dropped like a stone! She can be very proud of that.

    The doctor's guess that the spots on the liver could be dead tumor sounds sensible to me. Also, they can't tell exactly what they're looking at from a scan. I never had a CT scan before I got sick, and some of what my CT scans show are just benign growths that may have always been there. It's frustrating that we can't be absolutely certain what's going on inside. One of the main ways to check is to watch with CT scans over a period of months and years. Things that stay the same in one CT after another are not a problem, but it takes a long time to see that. It's very hard to learn patience about that. And if the doctor's guess is right you may be looking at dead tumor which the body will reabsorb between now and the next scan.

    This is a good time to celebrate all she's accomplished. The surgery and frontline chemo are tough experiences. Now you get to take a deep breath and get back to normal life. It may take a while for her to get her stamina back, but you can look forward to more and more normalcy.

    The drop in her CA-125 numbers was so fast, and she stayed at 8-9 for the last three treatments. That probably means the CA-125 will be a reliable marker for her, and that's a good thing. Scans show a lot of stuff, but there's no way to tell from a scan whether those things are benign or not. I never had a CT before I became ill, so we don't know which of my nodules, cysts, and lesions were always there and are not part of the cancer. Actually, there is a way to know -- when those things don't change over time we can conclude they're harmless -- but we all feel nervous waiting for the next CT scan. And when that scan gets done, then you'll find yourself being nervous waiting for the next one.

    The key indicator from now on is how she's feeling. When women have a recurrence of ovarian cancer, most doctors advise not to resume chemo until symptoms become a problem. That way the focus is on letting us get the most out of life -- when we feel good we get on with life, and if the disease rears up more chemo gets the symptoms under control so we can feel better again. If it does recur, please understand we don't have to go through the carbo/taxol regimen over and over - that's a tough combination, and there are easier treatments that are usually used for recurrence. Anyway, it's way too soon to worry about that. For now, her CA-125 is very low, she completed the six carbo/taxol treatments, and it's time to let her body recover from that. When a recurrence is suspected, they look for a very steep rise in CA-125 that continues rising for months, plus a return of symptoms, plus clear evidence of new growth in a CT scan. So it usually takes months to decide if it's time to have more treatment. The good side of that is that you shouldn't expect to get hit over the head with a brick again like we are when we're first diagnosed. When we're first diagnosed it often seems to come on so suddenly, and it comes out of the blue. One day you're fine and the next day life starts to turn upside down, and before we know it we're doing surgery and then chemo. Recurrence is not like that. If the disease is going to come back, it has to start all over again from a very, very low level. The first time around it's like getting mugged in the dark. Now all the lights are on. They'll monitor her CA-125 and do CT scans from time to time, and always monitor how she's feeling. If it comes back you'll see it coming from a long way off.
    Diagnosed with stage 2c papillary serous cystadenoma borderline malignancy of the ovary in 2009. Hysterectomy, omenectomy, appendectomy, debulking.
    - 2010 - laparoscopy showed inoperable recurrence, so started chemo.
    - Frontline chemo - carboplatin and cyclophosphamide, six cycles
    - Additional chemo regimens: Avastin - ten cycles; Weekly Topotecan - 4 cycles.
    - Spring 2012 developed pleural nodules. Topotecan plus Avastin - 1year.
    - April, 2014, had surgery to remove Aspergillus infection from right lung.
    - September, 2015, started on Megace because my tumors are PR positive. Stopped Megace after three months.
    - September, 2016, hospitalized for shortness of breath and back pain.
    - September, 2016, respiratory failure reversed with prednisone. Maintaining on 50 mg Prednisone per day and supplemental O2.
    - October, 2016 left hospital with no supplemental oxygen. Feeling great! Will start tapering off the prednisone Oct. 10.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serous2c View Post
    Hi Lucas, it sounds like she had a wonderful response to the chemo! I assume the numbers you gave are her CA-125 levels? They dropped like a stone! She can be very proud of that.

    The doctor's guess that the spots on the liver could be dead tumor sounds sensible to me. Also, they can't tell exactly what they're looking at from a scan. I never had a CT scan before I got sick, and some of what my CT scans show are just benign growths that may have always been there. It's frustrating that we can't be absolutely certain what's going on inside. One of the main ways to check is to watch with CT scans over a period of months and years. Things that stay the same in one CT after another are not a problem, but it takes a long time to see that. It's very hard to learn patience about that. And if the doctor's guess is right you may be looking at dead tumor which the body will reabsorb between now and the next scan.

    This is a good time to celebrate all she's accomplished. The surgery and frontline chemo are tough experiences. Now you get to take a deep breath and get back to normal life. It may take a while for her to get her stamina back, but you can look forward to more and more normalcy.

    The drop in her CA-125 numbers was so fast, and she stayed at 8-9 for the last three treatments. That probably means the CA-125 will be a reliable marker for her, and that's a good thing. Scans show a lot of stuff, but there's no way to tell from a scan whether those things are benign or not. I never had a CT before I became ill, so we don't know which of my nodules, cysts, and lesions were always there and are not part of the cancer. Actually, there is a way to know -- when those things don't change over time we can conclude they're harmless -- but we all feel nervous waiting for the next CT scan. And when that scan gets done, then you'll find yourself being nervous waiting for the next one.

    The key indicator from now on is how she's feeling. When women have a recurrence of ovarian cancer, most doctors advise not to resume chemo until symptoms become a problem. That way the focus is on letting us get the most out of life -- when we feel good we get on with life, and if the disease rears up more chemo gets the symptoms under control so we can feel better again. If it does recur, please understand we don't have to go through the carbo/taxol regimen over and over - that's a tough combination, and there are easier treatments that are usually used for recurrence. Anyway, it's way too soon to worry about that. For now, her CA-125 is very low, she completed the six carbo/taxol treatments, and it's time to let her body recover from that. When a recurrence is suspected, they look for a very steep rise in CA-125 that continues rising for months, plus a return of symptoms, plus clear evidence of new growth in a CT scan. So it usually takes months to decide if it's time to have more treatment. The good side of that is that you shouldn't expect to get hit over the head with a brick again like we are when we're first diagnosed. When we're first diagnosed it often seems to come on so suddenly, and it comes out of the blue. One day you're fine and the next day life starts to turn upside down, and before we know it we're doing surgery and then chemo. Recurrence is not like that. If the disease is going to come back, it has to start all over again from a very, very low level. The first time around it's like getting mugged in the dark. Now all the lights are on. They'll monitor her CA-125 and do CT scans from time to time, and always monitor how she's feeling. If it comes back you'll see it coming from a long way off.

    Hello
    Thank you very much for a quick reply
    Yes I gave you CA-125 numbers , yes she had a very good response for a treatment
    Before she had a laparoscopy she has had CT scan done where is showed small tumor there(about 2cm)tumor has been removed only some spots left as showed on last CT scan
    I am surprised that Chemo did not kill it as it killed rest of cancer cells (my wife's cancer was spread almost everywhere) i hope now will stay as it is and won't back quick
    She goes on proper diet (no sugar , healthy food , supplements such as vit C ,Noni juice, flax seed oil etc)

 

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