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Thread: Wife just "diagnosed"

  1. #1

    Wife just "diagnosed"

    Wife was having trouble breathing about 10 days ago, took her to emergency room, X-ray showed fluid between lung and rib cage, causing lung to collapse. Drained fluid from that area plus from abdomen, which was swollen (we always thought it was fat). Further tests showed mass on ovary and nodules on abdominal area. They told us late stage ovarian cancer, subject to biopsy. Fluid was sent for cytology, and the fluid from abdomen showed no cancer cells, from chest showed atypical cells they couldn't say it was cancer cells.

    I got an appointment withDr Douglas Levine wh just became Director of Gyn/Onclogy at NYU Langone, came from Sloan Kettering where he held the same position. Examined her couldn't feel anything (said he often feels the tumor, and sometimes feels it wrapped around lower bowel, but in this case felt nothing. Gave us 5% chance that it was not cancer.

    Then he looked at the scans of Lung, abdomen and pelvis, called the next day said there was less tumor volume than he expected, and even less than he usually sees in newly diagnosed patients. Raised chance of no cancer to 10%, still in "need a miracle" territory, and we are not hanging our hat on it.

    CA 125 was 2500 (normal range 6 months ago). She is 65 years old. Breast Cancer stage 1 25 years ago, her CA15-3 (BrCa marker) has been jumping around above normal for last 8 years, and the last three results, 6 months apart were 42, 49 and 56. Dr has said all along its her new normal, (we are done with that Dr) but the 56 was just done in the hospital, I'm praying it's not a recurrence, that will complicate things, hoping it comes down after surgery, with the ca 125.


    We think surgery will be Monday, waiting for confirmation, pre surgical testing tomorrow. I am sick. My kids are sick. I've read the stats for late stage, I know stats are for groups not individuals, still it seems dismal if it is in fact late stage. And as long as she lives, her life will be full of dr appointments, her worst nightmare, she hates going to and talking to Drs I have to handle everything
    Don't know what to expect.

    On top of all this my daughter is getting married First week March, at which time I would assume wife will be just finishing Chemo, I hope she is ok enough to enjoy the (very big) wedding. Least of my troubles, but still important to us.

    I don't know what to expect, this is way worse for me than when I had Prostate Cancer 2 years ago, I'm not as educated on this as I was then, partially because I did some reading, then decided I don't want to know any more than I need to know, it upsets me. So I'm putting us in the hands of this well reputed Dr Levine, and trusting him (more than I usually do Trust Drs)

    Don't even know if there is a question here, just venting I guess. I don't know stage, type yet, so can't get too specific.

    Thank for letting me vent, any suggestions on what to expect with surgery, chemo, etc (and even what he strength will be for the wedding) are appreciated
    Diagnosed at age 64 (in November, 2014), PSA 4.32
    Nov 2014 BX 3 of 12 cores positive original pathology G6 10%, G6 20%, second biopsy, 1st negative
    G8 (3+5), 70%. Johns Hopkins second opinion, G3+5=8 downgraded to 3+3=6 @80%
    Surgery with Dr Ash Tewari Jan 6, 2015
    Post surgical pathology, stage T2c, bilateral disease, upstaged to G7(3+4)
    5% of Prostate involved in Tumor
    Organ confined, negative Margins, negative SV, negative lymph nodes (9) PNI positive
    PSA 2/15 <.02, 4/15<.02, 7/15<.02, 10/15 0.00 (different lab), 1/16 0.00

  2. #2
    Administrator Top User lisa1962's Avatar
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    Hi pratoman,

    While I can not provide any reasonable knowledge regarding the situation at hand, I can say, vent all you need or want. You know we are all very good listeners even if we do not have the answers you are looking for. Its no different across these forums and will be here for you as you travel this path with your dear wife.

    The Ovarian forum is not very active but there are some here that have a wealth of knowledge so please do check back often.

    For now, keep yourselves busy and prayers, fingers crossed and thoughts sent your way that the doctors got this wrong and a diagnosis will not be the outcome. If it is, then you know we are here.

    Lisa

  3. #3
    Moderator Top User BobInBonita's Avatar
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    I'm so sorry to hear about your wifes potential diagnosis.

    I've followed your story on the prostate forum, but usually don't comment there (or here) because I have no experience with those specific cancers. Your concerns about your wife are the universal concerns that we all face as we go through the diagnostic process. We understand and have been there, either ourselves or with our loved ones.

    You mention that you've looked at the statistics for late stage. I love numbers and would do the same, and would feel the same shock and fear that you did. (I was given 5-7 months over 4 years ago.) Please remember that you don't have a diagnosis yet and that the stats you looked at were the worst case and were probably from studies started years ago. Things have changed in treatment and survival. The stats always talk about the median survival. The median is what the middle patient in the study would have survived. The median is generally much worse than the average or mean survival because it doesn't look at how long people can survive (the tail of the curve). Even if there are only a few long term survivors, the only way you can become one is by going for it. You're still here because you went for it. She will do the same.

    My best wishes to both of you.

    Bob
    7/12 DX stage 3 pan can (adenocarcinoma) @ 65 - borderline resectable
    8/12 - 10/12 Chemo (GTX) & Stereotactic Radiation
    12/12 Whipple - R0 margins, 2/29 nodes pos.
    1/13 - 5/16 Vaccine clinical trial - randomized to control group - vaccine showed no benefit
    2/13 - 8/13 Gemzar for 6 months
    Quarterly scans - no evidence of disease to 10/14 - spot on lung being watched - possible infection 2 months on antibiotics
    3/15 - spot larger - probable met - surgery planned
    4/15 - PET prior to surg - recurrence & lung mets - Surgery cancelled - EUS w/ FNA showed adenocarcinoma - Stage 4
    5/15 - 9/15 Folfirinox @ reduced dosage - Stopped treatment after 11 infusions due to neuropathy
    10/15 - 8/16 maintenance 5-fu every other week
    8/16 - stable disease on both CT and PET/CT - chemo holiday while other treatments explored
    9/16 - lung biopsy confirms pan can met,
    10/16 -NanoKnife to pancreatic bed -PET after Nano showed new met in hilar lymph nodes - SBRT to both lung & lymph

    Still open to immuno-oncology trials (vaccines or checkpoint inhibitors) if I find one I'm eligible for.

  4. #4
    Moderator Top User jorola's Avatar
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    Hello Pratoman,

    I am so sorry for all your family is going through. Vent away my friend and remember to breathe.

    If by surgery you mean a hysterectomy I can help you prepare a bit there. Some info may seem TMI but it will help. I know this as I am booked for my surgery on the 27th and been preparing for a month now. Likely she will be in hospital 2 to 3 days. This surgery really affects the bowels and constipation is a real problems. Use stool softens, plenty of little walks and eat lots of fiber rich foods and of course lots of water. Often they recommend a little stool in front of the toilet. Supposed to help align your bowel better and help you go. She'll has bad gas pains from the gas they inject her. Again walking and worse case have her get on her hands and knees on the bed and push her butt upwards and rock back and forth. Seems silly but it is supposed to work. They recommend a "nesting area" for recovery for her to rest with lots of pillows for support. If they take both ovaries she will go into surgical menopause. Not sure if they will but her on hormones right away . Even still her hormones may go completely out of whack which means crying and being angry for no reason. Please patient and kind and gentle. God knows she, all of you, are going through enough, but she has no control over this. General recovery from this surgery is 4 to 8 weeks. It is a MAJOR surgery in itself.

    As a fellow caregiver I know how this can being wearing on a person but you love them with all your heart and you'll do it any way. Try to bring in help - friends, family, church, whomever. For her and you. You can't do it all and THAT IS OK! So don't feel guilty.

    If there are any questions you have for please please do not hesitate to send me a private message or ask on here ok?

    Please take care and remember it is not cancer until the biopsy confirms it.

    Jodie
    Wife to husband with squamous lung cancer stage 3 b
    dx - April 20/14
    tx started May 20/14 - radiation and chemo
    June 23 - chemo finished
    June 24 - tumor 1/3 the original size
    July 4 - radiation finished
    July 8 - PET scan shows tumor almost gone, lymph nodes back to normal
    Married July 19/14
    Sept 9/14 - repeat can shows tumor continues to shrink more, no new spots. New coughing and pain due to chest infection or side effect of radiation.
    Sept 19/14 - not infection but pneumonitis, place on dex for 4 weeks
    Oct 22/14 - now off of dex and facing even more symptoms of withdrawal
    Dec 16/14 - pretty much nothing left but a scar
    April 7/15 - ditto scan and screw you stats
    Oct 6/15 - more scarring but still cancer still gone
    Feb 2016 -scan the same
    Aug 2016 - more of the same

  5. #5
    Thanks Lisa, Bob, and Jodie.

    @Lisa - i think the OC forum is not active, and there are not many other active OC forums from what i can tell, because its just not that common. 22,000 new cases diagnosed per year. Compare that to breast, or prostate cancer. DIfferent ball game. But more deadly, i believe.

    @Bob - i haven't posted on the Prostate forum here in a long time. I felt bad, but just didnt have the time, i am a member of another websites PC forum that is extremely active. But i dont want to post about this situation here, because some of the guys and their wives have met my wife, and my wife is extremely private about this, so i can't really share this news over there.

    @Jodie - Good luck with your surgery. And thanks for the information. Yes its a hysterectomy, including uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, and also possibly colon resection if there is colon involvement. I am hoping she is one of the lucky ones and doesnt require that last one.
    I'm not very good at being a caregiver, I'm a very nervous dude, i ask too many questions, etc. But its not an excuse, i'm married to this woman for 40 years last month, and i'll give her the best help i possibly can. I can't ask for much help from friends, she doesnt even want to talk to any of her friends right now, and doesnt want me to share too much info. As i said above, she is very private, feels if she's with people and she knows, that they know whats going on, it reminds her about her situation, and she doesnt want to be reminded (no, she wont go for professional help, i know for sure she would never, its not the way she is and ive talked to her about it multiple times). Strange but thats the way she is built. I'll manage on my own, with some help from my kids. I imagine after the first week past surgery, she will be ok to take care of herself physically at least.
    Then the chemo, which i imagine will be a PITA. But i know she is a tough woman, and they have ways of controlling side effects.

    Re menopause, she's 65, so past menopause so i dont think it will be an issue. Also, i dont think she can take hormones, having been a 2 time breast cancer survivor (so far).

    I am concerned about the wedding and what shape she'll be in, but Dr says she should be fine, just get a nice wig.

    I'm not hanging my hat on the 10% chance that its not cancer, especially with her CA125 MARKER so high. I dont want to set myself up for disappointment, and hearing the diagnosis all over again. I am just hoping its not too extensive and less agressive genetics (they will do genetic testing on the tumor in case they can tailor a targeted treatment)
    The good news is that her Dr is one of the best. From my experience with Prostate Cancer, i learned how to ferret out the best Drs i could find. And along with the help of a friend, i got to this guy, so hopefully that makes a difference in her chances.

    Anyway, I'm scared, and I'm spent. Drs appointments all day tomorrow, praying we dont run into a problem during pre surgical testing and clearance that prevents the surgery from happening.

    Thanks for listeinging and thanks for your comments.
    Diagnosed at age 64 (in November, 2014), PSA 4.32
    Nov 2014 BX 3 of 12 cores positive original pathology G6 10%, G6 20%, second biopsy, 1st negative
    G8 (3+5), 70%. Johns Hopkins second opinion, G3+5=8 downgraded to 3+3=6 @80%
    Surgery with Dr Ash Tewari Jan 6, 2015
    Post surgical pathology, stage T2c, bilateral disease, upstaged to G7(3+4)
    5% of Prostate involved in Tumor
    Organ confined, negative Margins, negative SV, negative lymph nodes (9) PNI positive
    PSA 2/15 <.02, 4/15<.02, 7/15<.02, 10/15 0.00 (different lab), 1/16 0.00

  6. #6
    Moderator Top User jorola's Avatar
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    Hi again,

    You are right, she likely is in menopause or even done and could not take hormones due to the breast cancer anyway.

    I respect she is a private person. Makes it hard though sometimes doesn't it? After the first week she will be sore but yes she should manage on her own. It just takes time. Thank you for your kind wishes. I'll be ok - just time for me too.

    Just make sure you do get help where you can so you do not wear yourself out.

    I know about being nervous and asking many questions. When my husband was going through his treatment I bombarded him with questions. God forbid he coughed. This place really helped. Many supportive people helped me to understand through their experiences and sometimes they just let me vent. We can do that for you too.

    As for the wedding - try to get through the these first steps first. I know you are worrying but I would suggest you keep your energy focused on what's happening right now.

    Try to rest. Sleep is important.

    Jodie
    Wife to husband with squamous lung cancer stage 3 b
    dx - April 20/14
    tx started May 20/14 - radiation and chemo
    June 23 - chemo finished
    June 24 - tumor 1/3 the original size
    July 4 - radiation finished
    July 8 - PET scan shows tumor almost gone, lymph nodes back to normal
    Married July 19/14
    Sept 9/14 - repeat can shows tumor continues to shrink more, no new spots. New coughing and pain due to chest infection or side effect of radiation.
    Sept 19/14 - not infection but pneumonitis, place on dex for 4 weeks
    Oct 22/14 - now off of dex and facing even more symptoms of withdrawal
    Dec 16/14 - pretty much nothing left but a scar
    April 7/15 - ditto scan and screw you stats
    Oct 6/15 - more scarring but still cancer still gone
    Feb 2016 -scan the same
    Aug 2016 - more of the same

  7. #7
    Pratoman, I'm so sorry I missed your message when you first posted.

    Ovarian cancer is a very unique cancer. It has lots of "quirks." Some things that seem to be unbreakable rules with other cancers just don't apply to ovarian cancer. Which is good, actually. The quirks help the patient and doctor to deal with it.

    Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at a late stage (stage 3 or 4). It just doesn't put out symptoms until late in the game. Your wife's CA-125 was normal 6 months ago; now it's very high -- that seems to be the way OC works.

    With many other cancers being diagnosed at a late stage is really bad news. But that's really not the case with OC. They learned decades ago that with OC, surgery to remove all the cancer they can see in the abdominal cavity is very, very helpful, no matter what the stage is. More than half of OC patients have ascites (free fluid in the abdomen) at diagnosis. Many also have a pleural effusion. Surgery usually stops the ascites and in many women it never comes back. If it does come back, one or two chemo treatments usually stops it cold and most women don't have ascites again for years if ever.

    There are about two dozen specific types of ovarian cancer. They each have their own specific ways of working. When you read the five-year survival statistics, you are seeing only the statistics for the most common (and one of the most aggressive) of those two dozen subtypes. And those statistics are at least five years old. In addition, those statistics include women who never have surgery or chemo. The statistics include many very elderly women, and they include women with multiple serious medical problems in addition to the ovarian cancer.

    You really have to wait for the pathologists to thoroughly examine the tumor tissue they remove in surgery. Then you will know exactly what type of ovarian cancer she has and you can concentrate on that disease and ignore all the others. It can take one to three weeks to get the final report.

    Always keep in mind you don't really know if she has cancer yet. Ovaries are odd little gadgets, and they can do many spooky things without being malignant. And if it is cancer, some ovarian cancers are slow growing and indolent. What she is going through is serious, clearly, but there's a very, very broad scope of possibilities. The waiting, I think, is one of the hardest parts -- all those unknowns and what-ifs really wear you down. Once they were able to tell me what is was and what could be done about it, it was a lot easier for me. Being in chemo is like having a new job. There are things to do and schedules to keep, and I felt good about that. Usually chemo lasts only four months, so it's quickly over. 80% of ovarian cancer patients have a complete remission after six chemo treatments.

    No one can promise what your wife's experience will be, but I felt so much better on chemo. I sure didn't expect that! I felt fantastic after the surgery, and even better on chemo. I think we're not fully aware of how much strain the disease puts on your body, day in and day out. I just kept finding new ways of coping with the fatigue, the shortness of breath, trying to make myself eat -- it was so very hard. I hope her experience with surgery and chemo will be like mine.

    I was diagnosed Stage 2, but we've never been sure if some growths on the pleura in my chest were benign or tumor, so I think I could easily have been classed as Stage 4. Like your wife, I had both ascites and a pleural effusion which had collapsed one of my lungs. Like your wife, the cells in my ascites were abnormal but not cancerous. They told me the fluids in my abdomen and chest weighed 22 pounds. Just carrying all that weight around is a huge burden for the patient. Once they know what's happening they can drain the fluids and that gives instant relief.

    I didn't have any big tumors. A tumor had replaced 1/2 of my right ovary, and there was some more growing on top of the left ovary. I had one small implant on top of my bladder, and another on top of the bowel. And that was all -- no huge tumor burden, and no problems that made removal difficult.

    My tumor ended up being a borderline serous ovarian tumor. It's quite uncommon. It's almost always cured by surgery. It hardly ever kills anyone. In my case surgery did not cure it, but it's a very slow-growing tumor which often is categorized as "indolent." I was diagnosed 7 and one-half years ago and almost all of this time I've been classified as a very healthy cancer patient. Now..... I've had some other problems which are not related to the cancer, and those other problems have complicated things. But that's not the ovarian cancer's fault. I had a crisis two weeks ago and the first thing they said was, "This isn't the tumor you were diagnosed with. Something else is up." They're still trying to find out what that something else is.

    You've discovered the world of abdominal fluid and pleural effusions, so please let me caution you about googling those words. Ascites (the abdominal fluid) can be caused by several different diseases, and it is usually bad, bad news. But ovarian cancer is a big exception to that rule. With ovarian cancer it is not an end-stage indicator. With ovarian cancer ascites is usually treatable and reversible. When you go to any doctor but your ovarian cancer oncologist, when they see you have ascites the doctor will become very, very kind and very quiet. That's because they've been taught about ascites and all the other diseases that cause it, and the consequence of those diseases. With OC, it's an entirely different thing and your oncologist will know that.

    You've already learned that there are many chemotherapy agents and they're used in different doses and combinations depending on what cancer is involved. Some chemos are very tough on the patient. By and large, I think the chemo regimen used for ovarian cancer is quite moderate. It's certainly much easier than some treatments I've read about for other cancers.

    The Gold Standard for ovarian cancer is a platinum compound (usually carboplatin) combined with a taxane (usually taxol). The traditional schedule is six treatments, with one treatment every 3 weeks.

    During the seven years I've been involved, they've been making a lot of refinements in the schedule of treatments and in the treatment method. You're at an excellent treatment hospital, so your oncologist will know about them. They will choose among these refinements based on your wife's individual needs and limitations. For instance, it's been pretty traditional for every patient to get carboplatin by IV. But they've had very good success using cisplatin instead and infusing it directly into the abdominal cavity instead of having putting it into a vein. It can be more difficult for the patient to tolerate, so they take into consideration the woman's other health problems, general stamina, her wishes, etc. It's a very individual thing. Another change they're doing now is giving weekly treatments at a much lower dose instead of a big treatment once every three weeks. From what I've heard that's easier for the patient to tolerate and they're getting good results with it. Again it's individual -- a weekly treatment is a big burden on some patients' time, while other patients don't mind the extra trips at all. It's nice to see that they are looking for changes they can make to add a little more efficacy to a tried-and-true treatment regimen.

    Ovarian cancer is one of the cancers where they've made huge improvements in treating it as a chronic, manageable disease. At first I found that incredibly depressing. I've always dreaded the idea of having a chronic illness. But I got used to the idea and now I'm grateful, because in these seven years I've found it really was manageable, and although I may be "chronically ill" the truth is I've been healthier during these past seven years than I was for years before the diagnosis.

    I am also very private and was very uncertain about who to tell, whether to tell anyone, etc. I did attend a local support group for women with gynecological cancers. That was very good for me. I expected to walk into a room full of walkers and IV poles and thought I would take notes on which nursing homes they like best. The women were incredibly active, leading full lives and normal lives. It made me stop feeling sorry for myself and accept I wasn't helpless and had better get busy living instead of dwelling on what I can't control. I would not attend a general cancer support group, because time is better spent concentrating on my specific disease. In the end I've told the full story to just a few close friends who will not gossip about it. And I've joined support groups online -- I like the anonymity, and I've made some good friends online whom I email with. One of my online friends has had OC for 21 years, and she has been a fount of knowledge. It's odd, but if I had never gotten cancer I would have missed out on some great friendships.

    I know a lot of cancer-free people who are horribly ill and I sure wouldn't trade places with them.

    I hope your wife's surgery goes well, that you'll get clear answers about what's going on, and that she'll have a very successful treatment. And I hope your wife has a ball at your daughter's wedding!
    Diagnosed with stage 2c papillary serous cystadenoma borderline malignancy of the ovary in 2009. Hysterectomy, omenectomy, appendectomy, debulking.
    - 2010 - laparoscopy showed inoperable recurrence, so started chemo.
    - Frontline chemo - carboplatin and cyclophosphamide, six cycles
    - Additional chemo regimens: Avastin - ten cycles; Weekly Topotecan - 4 cycles.
    - Spring 2012 developed pleural nodules. Topotecan plus Avastin - 1year.
    - April, 2014, had surgery to remove Aspergillus infection from right lung.
    - September, 2015, started on Megace because my tumors are PR positive. Stopped Megace after three months.
    - September, 2016, hospitalized for shortness of breath and back pain.
    - September, 2016, respiratory failure reversed with prednisone. Maintaining on 50 mg Prednisone per day and supplemental O2.
    - October, 2016 left hospital with no supplemental oxygen. Feeling great! Will start tapering off the prednisone Oct. 10.

  8. #8
    Serous2c, thank you, very useful post and helps a lot.

    Unfortunately, (I think) the situation has changed....

    After being readmitted to hospital (NYU Langone) to have fluid drained from lung again, 1 liter, then 2 more liters the next day, she developed 3 tiny blood clots in her lung, and was put on heparin, now on Lovanex injections.

    Surgery has been cancelled, and she will start with chemo, each cycle consist of week 1 Carboplatin) next 2 weeks Taxol). Will last about 2 months. Then 3-4 weeks to recover, then surgery in January. Then more chemo. We are so disappointed in this development. We were hoping for quick debulking surgery.
    They first need to get pathology, so they are testing the drained fluid for cancer cells for definitive diagnosis, if none are evident, they will do a biopsy. She will remain in hospital until diagnosis is definitive then be released and start chemo ASAP. Sucks.

    Also, and. Don't think it means anything, when she was tested 3 weeks ago, at a different hospital, before we got to NYU, HER CA125 was 2500. They retested at NYU Langone, it came back at 1600. I don't know but I don't think it means much. And Dr told us the level of CA125 is not correlated with how much cancer there is.
    Diagnosed at age 64 (in November, 2014), PSA 4.32
    Nov 2014 BX 3 of 12 cores positive original pathology G6 10%, G6 20%, second biopsy, 1st negative
    G8 (3+5), 70%. Johns Hopkins second opinion, G3+5=8 downgraded to 3+3=6 @80%
    Surgery with Dr Ash Tewari Jan 6, 2015
    Post surgical pathology, stage T2c, bilateral disease, upstaged to G7(3+4)
    5% of Prostate involved in Tumor
    Organ confined, negative Margins, negative SV, negative lymph nodes (9) PNI positive
    PSA 2/15 <.02, 4/15<.02, 7/15<.02, 10/15 0.00 (different lab), 1/16 0.00

  9. #9
    Pratoman, I'm sorry she can't get the surgery over with right away. From what I've heard and read it's just as effective to do some chemo first, then surgery, then the rest of the chemo -- but I would think it's harder for the patient to add more waiting time into the process.

    I've been told ca-125 is a marker for inflammation, not for cancer itself. I'm betting draining the lung brings the ca-125 down.
    Diagnosed with stage 2c papillary serous cystadenoma borderline malignancy of the ovary in 2009. Hysterectomy, omenectomy, appendectomy, debulking.
    - 2010 - laparoscopy showed inoperable recurrence, so started chemo.
    - Frontline chemo - carboplatin and cyclophosphamide, six cycles
    - Additional chemo regimens: Avastin - ten cycles; Weekly Topotecan - 4 cycles.
    - Spring 2012 developed pleural nodules. Topotecan plus Avastin - 1year.
    - April, 2014, had surgery to remove Aspergillus infection from right lung.
    - September, 2015, started on Megace because my tumors are PR positive. Stopped Megace after three months.
    - September, 2016, hospitalized for shortness of breath and back pain.
    - September, 2016, respiratory failure reversed with prednisone. Maintaining on 50 mg Prednisone per day and supplemental O2.
    - October, 2016 left hospital with no supplemental oxygen. Feeling great! Will start tapering off the prednisone Oct. 10.

  10. #10
    Moderator Top User jorola's Avatar
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    Dear Pratoman,

    Yes change in plans but goal remains the same so that is what counts right?

    Hang in there you two!
    Wife to husband with squamous lung cancer stage 3 b
    dx - April 20/14
    tx started May 20/14 - radiation and chemo
    June 23 - chemo finished
    June 24 - tumor 1/3 the original size
    July 4 - radiation finished
    July 8 - PET scan shows tumor almost gone, lymph nodes back to normal
    Married July 19/14
    Sept 9/14 - repeat can shows tumor continues to shrink more, no new spots. New coughing and pain due to chest infection or side effect of radiation.
    Sept 19/14 - not infection but pneumonitis, place on dex for 4 weeks
    Oct 22/14 - now off of dex and facing even more symptoms of withdrawal
    Dec 16/14 - pretty much nothing left but a scar
    April 7/15 - ditto scan and screw you stats
    Oct 6/15 - more scarring but still cancer still gone
    Feb 2016 -scan the same
    Aug 2016 - more of the same

 

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