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Thread: (A) General Prostate Cancer

  1. #1

    (A) General Prostate Cancer

    Table of Contents
    A title in all caps does not reflect any emphasis; it is simply how it appeared on the page I copied from.
    Studies in red are new additions.


    [#1] Evolution: Back to the future to understand and control prostate cancer [2014]

    Obituary for Donald S. Coffey: Pioneer in the field of prostate cancer research. Born in Bristol on October 10, 1932, he died in Baltimore on November 9th, 2017, at the Age of 85 [2018]

    Donald S. Coffey, the Brady Long Rifles, and the war on prostate cancer [2018]

    [#2] The future of prostate cancer research: bringing data together, looking back and forward [2018]

    [#3] Prostate cancer and social media [2018]

    Cancer and Social Media: A Comparison of Traffic about Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, and Other Reproductive Cancers on Twitter and Instagram [2018]

    [#4] EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on Prostate Cancer. Part 1: Screening, Diagnosis, and Local Treatment with Curative Intent [2017]

    EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on Prostate Cancer. Part II: Treatment of Relapsing, Metastatic, and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer [2017]

    [#5] "The Worst Thing Was…": Prostate Cancer Patients' Evaluations of Their Diagnosis and Treatment Experiences [2018]

    [#6] Randomised Controlled Trials Remain the Key to Progress in Localised Prostate Cancer [2018]

    [#7] MALIGNANT WEBSITES? ANALYZING THE QUALITY OF PROSTATE CANCER EDUCATION WEB RESOURCES [2018]

    [#8] Psychotherapeutic Interventions Targeting Prostate Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review of the Literature [2018]

    [#9] Readability of Prostate Cancer Information Online: A Cross-Sectional Study [2018]

    [#10] Metastatic prostate carcinoma from Imperial Rome (1st-2nd century A.D.) [2018]

    [#11] Total Medicare Costs Associated With Diagnosis and Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Elderly Men [2018]

    [#12] The experience of low-income men with prostate cancer transitioning from disease-specific coverage to comprehensive insurance under the affordable care act [2018]

    [#13] Gender bias in sexual health education: why boys do not know where the prostate is? [2019]

    [#14] Maintaining masculinity: Moral positioning when accounting for prostate cancer illness [2019]

    [#15] Investigating the role of psychological flexibility, masculine self-esteem and stoicism as predictors of psychological distress and quality of life in men living with prostate cancer [2019]

    Last edited by DjinTonic; 06-03-2019 at 01:03 PM.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
    [Table of Contents p.3]

  4. #4
    [Table of Contents p.4]

  5. #5
    [Table of Contents p.5]

  6. #6
    [#1]
    Evolution: Back to the future to understand and control prostate cancer [2014, Full Text]

    Donald S. Coffee, former Director of the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214388215000211?via%3Dihub

    An excellent essay with questions and proposed answers about why we all wound up in this boat. Why are humans and dogs the only mammals that get prostate cancer with any frequency?

    Previously posted in the Forum:
    https://www.cancerforums.net/threads/54498-Evolution-Back-to-the-future-to-understand-and-control-prostate-cancer

    Obituary for Donald S. Coffey: Pioneer in the field of prostate cancer research. Born in Bristol on October 10, 1932, he died in Baltimore on November 9th, 2017, at the Age of 85 [2018]

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5844713/

    Donald S. Coffey, the Brady Long Rifles, and the war on prostate cancer [2018]

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902717/

    This editorial and memorial article reflects on the scientific teaching and mentorship of Donald S. Coffey, Ph.D., his intellectual gifts and humanity, and the Brady Long Rifle meetings.
    Last edited by DjinTonic; 04-18-2018 at 12:33 PM.

  7. #7
    [#2]
    The future of prostate cancer research: bringing data together, looking back and forward [2018, Full Text]

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5861293/

    Abstract
    The use of digital data in large data sets will be of pivotal importance to unravel the biological basis of prostate cancer, and to improve on prevention and treatment. For the screening of asymptomatic tumors, their identification, and their treatment with better and targeted therapies, the integration of information from imaging, genomics, and biomarkers is needed. To bring these (un)structured data together, block chain technology is required, while knowledgeable analysts should be available. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to ‘team up’ and provide a common strategy for innovation. Its implementation needs the involvement of all stakeholders (patients, industries, professionals, scientists, governments). This article provides thoughts on how initial steps in urology have been taken, and how to proceed.

    Introduction
    Data: the new gold
    The nature of data analysis has changed: fishing
    The technology: towards perfection
    The new partnership landscape
    What do we need?
    The experience: making larger data sets
    The potential: eliminating PCa
    Conclusions

    ...To chart the future of prostate cancer research a similar initiative is needed and a common roadmap might result which will enable multiple stakeholder to collaborate toward the common goal of eliminating PCa.

    As one of the major conclusions from our work we can confirm the African saying: “If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”. We would like to add: if you do not want to go, don’t pretend you are going anywhere. So, work on it, or don’t. Make a decision as a group of professionals or scientists.

    ❖ In order to perform screening, tumor identification, and targeted therapies better, we need integration of information from imaging, genomics, and biomarkers;
    ❖ To integrate (un)structured data better we need block chain technology and knowledgeable analytic people;
    ❖ To involve stakeholders convincingly we have to ‘team up’ and provide our common strategy for innovation there where we think it is most needed.
    [Emphasis mine]

  8. #8
    [#3]
    Prostate cancer and social media
    [2018]

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29643501

    Abstract

    The use of social media is increasing globally and is employed in a variety of ways in the prostate cancer community. In addition to their use in research, advocacy, and awareness campaigns, social media offer vast opportunities for education and networking for patients with prostate cancer and health-care professionals, and many educational resources and support networks are available to patients with prostate cancer and their caregivers. Despite the considerable potential for social media to be employed in the field of prostate cancer, concerns remain - particularly regarding the maintenance of patient confidentiality, variable information quality, and possible financial conflicts of interest. A number of professional societies have, therefore, issued guidance regarding social media use in medicine. Social media are used extensively in other cancer communities, particularly among patients with breast cancer, and both the quantity and type of information available are expected to grow in the future.

    Cancer and Social Media: A Comparison of Traffic about Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, and Other Reproductive Cancers on Twitter and Instagram [2018]

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10810730.2017.1421730

    Abstract

    Social media are often heralded as offering cancer campaigns new opportunities to reach the public. However, these campaigns may not be equally successful, depending on the nature of the campaign itself, the type of cancer being addressed, and the social media platform being examined. This study is the first to compare social media activity on Twitter and Instagram across three time periods: #WorldCancerDay in February, the annual month-long campaigns of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM) in October and Movember in November, and during the full year outside of these campaigns. Our results suggest that women’s reproductive cancers – especially breast cancer – tend to outperform men’s reproductive cancer – especially prostate cancer – across campaigns and social media platforms. Twitter overall generates substantially more activity than Instagram for both cancer campaigns, suggesting Instagram may be an untapped resource. However, the messaging for both campaigns tends to focus on awareness and support rather than on concrete actions and behaviors. We suggest health communication efforts need to focus on effective messaging and building engaged communities for cancer communication across social media platforms.
    Last edited by DjinTonic; 04-25-2018 at 12:09 PM.

  9. #9
    [#4]
    EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on Prostate Cancer. Part 1: Screening, Diagnosis, and Local Treatment with Curative Intent
    [2017, Full Text]

    https://www.europeanurology.com/article/S0302-2838(16)30470-5/fulltext

    Abstract

    Objective
    To present a summary of the 2016 version of the European Association of Urology (EAU) - European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) - International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Guidelines on screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent of clinically localised prostate cancer (PCa).

    Evidence acquisition
    The working panel performed a literature review of the new data (2013–2015). The guidelines were updated and the levels of evidence and/or grades of recommendation were added based on a systematic review of the evidence.

    Evidence synthesis
    BRCA2 mutations have been added as risk factors for early and aggressive disease. In addition to the Gleason score, the five-tier 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology grading system should now be provided. Systematic screening is still not recommended. Instead, an individual risk-adapted strategy following a detailed discussion and taking into account the patient's wishes and life expectancy must be considered. An early prostate-specific antigen test, the use of a risk calculator, or one of the promising biomarker tools are being investigated and might be able to limit the overdetection of insignificant PCa. Breaking the link between diagnosis and treatment may lower the overtreatment risk. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging using standardised reporting cannot replace systematic biopsy, but robustly nested within the diagnostic work-up, it has a key role in local staging. Active surveillance always needs to be discussed with very low-risk patients. The place of surgery in high-risk disease and the role of lymph node dissection have been clarified, as well as the management of node-positive patients. Radiation therapy using dose-escalated intensity-modulated technology is a key treatment modality with recent improvement in the outcome based on increased doses as well as combination with hormonal treatment. Moderate hypofractionation is safe and effective, but longer-term data are still lacking. Brachytherapy represents an effective way to increase the delivered dose. Focal therapy remains experimental while cryosurgery and HIFU are still lacking long-term convincing results.

    Conclusions
    The knowledge in the field of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of localised PCa is evolving rapidly. The 2016 EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on PCa summarise the most recent findings and advice for the use in clinical practice. These are the first PCa guidelines endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology and the International Society of Geriatric Oncology and reflect the multidisciplinary nature of PCa management. A full version is available from the EAU office and online ().

    Patient summary
    The 2016 EAU-STRO-IOG Prostate Cancer (PCa) Guidelines present updated information on the diagnosis, and treatment of clinically localised prostate cancer. In Northern and Western Europe, the number of men diagnosed with PCa has been on the rise. This may be due to an increase in opportunistic screening, but other factors may also be involved (eg, diet, sexual behaviour, low exposure to ultraviolet radiation). We propose that men who are potential candidates for screening should be engaged in a discussion with their clinician (also involving their families and caregivers) so that an informed decision may be made as part of an individualised risk-adapted approach.

    EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on Prostate Cancer. Part II: Treatment of Relapsing, Metastatic, and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer [2017, Full Text]

    https://www.europeanurology.com/article/S0302-2838(16)30469-9/fulltext

    Abstract

    Objective
    To present a summary of the 2016 version of the European Association of Urology (EAU) – European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) – International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Guidelines on the treatment of relapsing, metastatic, and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

    Evidence acquisition
    The working panel performed a literature review of the new data (2013–2015). The guidelines were updated, and the levels of evidence and/or grades of recommendation were added based on a systematic review of the literature.

    Evidence synthesis
    Relapse after local therapy is defined by a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >0.2 ng/ml following radical prostatectomy (RP) and >2 ng/ml above the nadir after radiation therapy (RT). 11C-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography is of limited importance if PSA is <1.0 ng/ml; bone scans and computed tomography can be omitted unless PSA is >10 ng/ml. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy are important to assess biochemical failure following RT. Therapy for PSA relapse after RP includes salvage RT at PSA levels <0.5 ng/ml and salvage RP, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryosurgical ablation or salvage brachytherapy of the prostate in radiation failures. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the basis for treatment of men with metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). However, docetaxel combined with ADT should be considered the standard of care for men with metastases at first presentation, provided they are fit enough to receive the drug. Follow-up of ADT should include analysis of PSA, testosterone levels, and screening for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Level 1 evidence for the treatment of metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) includes, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA/P), enzalutamide, radium 223 (Ra 223), docetaxel at 75 mg/m2 every 3 wk and sipuleucel-T. Cabazitaxel, AA/P, enzalutamide, and radium are approved for second-line treatment of CRPC following docetaxel. Zoledronic acid and denosumab can be used in men with mCRPC and osseous metastases to prevent skeletal-related complications.

    Conclusions
    The knowledge in the field of advanced and metastatic PCa and CRPC is changing rapidly. The 2016 EAU-ESTRO-SIOG Guidelines on PCa summarise the most recent findings and advice for use in clinical practice. These PCa guidelines are the first endorsed by the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the International Society of Geriatric Oncology and reflect the multidisciplinary nature of PCa management. A full version is available from the EAU office or online ().

    Patient summary
    In men with a rise in their PSA levels after prior local treatment for prostate cancer only, it is important to balance overtreatment against further progression of the disease since survival and quality of life may never be affected in many of these patients. For patients diagnosed with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, several new drugs have become available which may provide a clear survival benefit but the optimal choice will have to be made on an individual basis.

  10. #10
    [#5]
    " The Worst Thing Was…": Prostate Cancer Patients' Evaluations of Their Diagnosis and Treatment Experiences
    [2018]

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29708020

    Abstract

    The objective of the current study was to identify the patient-perceived “worst aspects” of their diagnostic and treatment processes for prostate cancer (PCa) so as to inform targeted interventions aimed at reducing patient anxiety and depression. Two hundred and fifty-two patients who had received their diagnoses less than 8 years ago answered a postal survey about (a) background information, (b) their own descriptions of the worst aspects of their diagnosis and treatment, and (c) their ratings of 13 aspects of that process for (i) how these aspects made them feel stressed, anxious, and depressed and (ii) how they affected their relationships with significant others. They also answered standardized scales of anxiety and depression. The worst aspects reported by patients were receiving the initial diagnosis of PCa, plus the unknown outcome of that diagnosis, because of the possibility of death, loss of quality of life and/or partner, and the shock of the diagnosis. The most common coping strategy was to “just deal with it,” but participants also thought that more information would help. Principal contributors to feeling stressed, anxious, and depressed were also the diagnosis itself, followed by surgery treatment effects. The aspects that most affected relationships were receiving the diagnosis and the side effects of hormone therapy. The identification of these specific worst aspects of the PCa experience provides a set of potential treatment and prevention “targets” for psychosocial care in PCa patients.

 

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