A website to provide support for people who have or have had any type of cancer, for their caregivers and for their family members.
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Positive D dimer caused by PC?

  1. #1

    Positive D dimer caused by PCA?

    I've been having some very intermittent problems with breathing while exercising for two years. Doctors have done it all...stress test, heart cath (heart actually looked awesome with very clean arteries), clear xrays, clear CT last December of the chest.

    So my cardiologist--despite the clear chest CT--ordered a D Dimer blood test that tests for the potential for pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis.

    Mine came back high, of course. Should be <.49 and mine was 1.66. I think it is a false positive and I don't have a PE or DVT.

    A little research shows Prostate cancer has a correlation with D dimer being elevated.

    My level is considered low risk for PE or DVT but is concerning nonetheless. I wondered if any of you guys ever had an elevated d dimer test that was found to be caused by the cancer.
    Last edited by IceStationZebra; 07-19-2019 at 04:24 PM.

  2. #2
    Experienced User
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    84
    Dear Ice,

    Could you be more specific about your breathing problems? What form does the problem take?

    Eric

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by enock View Post
    Dear Ice,

    Could you be more specific about your breathing problems? What form does the problem take?

    Eric
    If it is because of the breathing that means a pulmonary embolism or some form of deep vein thrombosis. I'd rather the slightly elevated reading be because I have prostate cancer, I think.

    The doc wants another CT of the chest so it will tell the story. If it's not the PE or DVT there are a number of other causes which includes pca.

    When the breathing problems happen it takes the form of breath drowning they call it. It's not asthma like (lungs tested fine, no asthma). The best analogy would be like trying to inflate a balloon while someone was compressing it from all sides. The funny thing is that it is intermittent.....walk 4 miles after work on Tuesday just fine and couldn't make it 100 yards on Thursday. No rhyme or reason.

    Very frustrated. It sounds funny but I want to get back to where all I have to worry about is pca.

  4. #4
    Well so as to not start another thread, this is getting frustrating.

    The CT from last week came back and thankfully no PE.

    However, I was also interested to see about the 5mm nodule they found on the right lower lobe of my lung last December. It was still 5mm after 8 months, so happy dance. Well until I read further. It now has friends.

    A 2mm and 6mm both on the left lung that were not noted in the December 2018 CT study. The CT readout said they were either stable or appeared stable and I was low risk (based on lifestyle, no risks I don't smoke). CT readout said follow up on the 6mm in 6-12 months. However, the CT is only evaluating those nodules absent the fact that there is pca on board. I think that changes things.

    Reading online, the most predominant cause of multiple nodules is metastatic cancer from some other tumor. Not guaranteed but it's the #1 cause.

    I see the pulmonologist Wednesday but I'm not sure what to do and whether this impacts my pca treatment. I'm not sure if the pca doc needs to know about this or if it can wait until the Sept biopsy.

    As the Irish would say, it kind of feels like I'm properly fooked here. This cant be anything but really bad is how I see it.

  5. #5
    As you first mentioned, when PCa cells establish themselves somewhere else, like a bone or a lung, it's called metastatic PCa to the bone, lung, etc, not bone cancer or lung cancer. Under the microscope PCa mets look about the same as the lesions seen in a prostate biopsy--it's abnormal tissue, but abnormal prostate tissue (and unlike the surrounding lung or liver tissue). Interestingly, genetics test have shown that it's often the case that all one's mets originated from a single prostate lesion.

    I don't see your signature, ISZ. Did you have a genomics test done? Always tell a new doc about your PCa and any other cancer history. PCa metastasizes most frequently to the bones and lymph nodes, but sometimes to the lungs, liver, and other organs. That doesn't mean your nodules are cancer.

    Djin
    Last edited by DjinTonic; 08-09-2019 at 06:43 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DjinTonic View Post
    As you first mentioned, when PCa cells establish themselves somewhere else, like a bone or a lung, it's called metastatic PCa to the bone, lung, etc, not bone cancer or lung cancer. Under the microscope PCa mets look about the same as the lesions seen in a prostate biopsy--it is still abnormal prostate tissue, although it's often the case that all one's mets originated from a single prostate lesion.

    I don't see your signature, ISZ. Always tell a new doc about your PCa and any other cancer history. PCa metastasizes most frequently to the bones and lymph nodes, but also to the lungs, liver, and other organs. Did you have a genomics test done?

    Djin
    I'm not sure why my signature isn't showing. I might have fixed it.

    By genomics testing, you're talking about my last biopsy? If so no the pca found was G6 2mm in size in only one core. There wasn't apparently enough to genetic test.

    What I meant above is that the radiologist reading the CT probably evaluated it as low risk based on my lifestyle not knowing I have pca.

    Kind of feels like the pca escaped. There's no reason I should be growing multiple nodules and certainly not two that fast. The 6mm grew larger than the one that's been there for some time prior to Dec 2018 and did it in 8 months or less.
    2006: 1.6 PSA age 36
    2007: 1.3 PSA age 37
    2012: 2.2 PSA age 42
    2013: 2.6 PSA age 43
    2014: 2.8 PSA age 44
    2015: 3.1 PSA age 45
    2016: 3.5 PSA age 46
    2017: ? N/A
    3/18– 4.1 PSA at 48 YO. u/s measured 46 ml prostate
    3/18–free PSA 10%
    3/18–12 core all negative
    9/18– 4.5 PSA
    9/18– negative pca3
    12/18- 4K at 17%
    12/18- 3t MRI, 5mm pirads 3-4 and a pirads 1-2
    2/19- Fusion biopsy. G6 (3+3) 20% of a single core
    AS for now
    4/19-PSA at 7.21 (up from 4.5 in September 2018! Gulp
    6/19-PSA back down to 4.8

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by IceStationZebra View Post
    I'm not sure why my signature isn't showing. I might have fixed it.

    By genomics testing, you're talking about my last biopsy? If so no the pca found was G6 2mm in size in only one core. There wasn't apparently enough to genetic test.

    What I meant above is that the radiologist reading the CT probably evaluated it as low risk based on my lifestyle not knowing I have pca.

    Kind of feels like the pca escaped. There's no reason I should be growing multiple nodules and certainly not two that fast. The 6mm grew larger than the one that's been there for some time prior to Dec 2018 and did it in 8 months or less.
    Two popular genomics tests are OncotypeDx and Decipher. Ask your uro if he thinks one would be worthwhile. Also check your insurance coverage. Done on your biopsied tissue which is sent to the testing company, a genomics test can estimate the risk of finding Geason Grade 4 or 5 if your prostate is examined after surgery, in other words, your risk of currently harboring higher-grade PCa. As you know, G6 (3+3) PCa cannot metastasize, but a biopsy samples only a tiny portion of the prostate.

  8. #8
    Oh and here is where one of those Djin studies that say I'm completely full of crap and don't know what I'm talking about would be REALLY handy! 😀

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by DjinTonic View Post
    Two popular genomics tests are OncotypeDx and Decipher. Ask your uro if he thinks one would be worthwhile. Also check your insurance coverage. Done on your biopsied tissue which is sent to the testing company, a genomics test can estimate the risk of finding Geason Grade 4 or 5 if your prostate is examined after surgery, in other words, your risk of currently harboring higher-grade PCa. As you know, G6 (3+3) PCa cannot metastasize, but a biopsy samples only a tiny portion of the prostate.
    Yes. That's always been in the back of my mind that there could be worse there.

    Now add the mystery d dimer test and these nodules and it just gets muddier. Oh well, saves me the hassle of retirement planning! 🤪

 

Similar Threads

  1. Does anyone have any advice about facial rash caused by Cetuximab?
    By Toots Hibbert in forum Colon Cancer and Rectal Cancer Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-14-2011, 04:39 AM
  2. Abscess caused by cancer?
    By beachgirl in forum Colon Cancer and Rectal Cancer Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-29-2011, 02:45 PM
  3. Hodgkins Disease treatment, caused further cancers
    By SueEnglefield in forum Lymphoma - Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-26-2009, 09:24 AM
  4. doctor say swollen lymph nodes caused by constant touching.
    By nur311 in forum Lymphoma - Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-06-2009, 11:24 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-20-2005, 12:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •